Friday, 7 April 2017

The Firm by John Grisham

Day 6 of #AtoZChallenge2017

John Grisham is undoubtedly the master of thrillers. With bestsellers like The Chamber, The Client, The Pelican Brief and many more to his credit, Grisham seems the exact formula to keep his readers completely hooked. Other than being packed with extreme levels of thrill and suspense, his books are well-researched and intelligent. The plots are always invigorating with no loopholes for doubt. The Firm by Grisham is by far one of my favourite thrillers so far in the list (and the list includes big names like that of Arthur Hailey, Sydney Sheldon, James Patterson etc.)

The plot revolves around a young ambitious just-out-of-law college Mitch McDeere who is thrilled to be an associate at one of the best tax firms in Memphis-Bendini, Lambert and Locke. The job offers everything he could dream of and even things he didn’t even dream of. Mitch and his beautiful wife Abby are thrilled by the extravagant lifestyle they are about to live. However, the extravaganza comes with a weird set of terms and conditions such as surrendering the privacy to the law firm which has houses of all the associates wired so they can pry upon each and every conversation happening in the house. The initially clueless Mitch soon becomes suspicious as he gets to hear weird things about the firm. For instance, no associate has left the firm in last 15 years except in a coffin. And that is when Mitch sets about to uncover the scandalous past of this perilous firm.

Grisham uses his knowledge as an attorney to create this meticulous thriller. At some points, you do expect a Hollywood-style twist in the tale and the author does meet the expectation. Nevertheless, the book literally keeps you on the edge of the seat and is absolutely unputdownable by all means. Not surprisingly, the book was made into a movie starring Tom Cruise, Gene Hackman and Ed Harris which was also amazing.


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